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Negative equity is disproportionately concentrated in the Chicago region’s communities of color, Woodstock Institute report shows

March 23, 2012 Leave a comment

Tom Feltner | Vice President
Woodstock Institute

Homeowners with mortgages in African American communities more than twice as likely to be underwater as homeowners in white communities

CHICAGO–Negative equity is disproportionately concentrated in the Chicago region’s African American, Latino, and majority minority neighborhoods, a new report from Woodstock Institute found. The report also found that borrowers in communities of color have much less equity on average than do borrowers in predominantly white communities.

View the full report here:  http://bit.ly/strugglingtostayafloat

Join us for a telephone briefing Tuesday March 27 at 10am CT:  http://stayingafloat.eventbrite.com/

The report, “Struggling to Stay Afloat:  Negative Equity in Communities of Color in the Chicago Six County Region,” used data from a major provider of mortgage and home value data to examine patterns of underwater homes in communities of various racial and ethnic compositions in the Chicago six county region in 2011. It found that:

  • Nearly one in four residential properties in the Chicago six county region is underwater, with just under $25 billion of negative equity. The average underwater property has 31.8 percent more outstanding mortgage debt than the property is worth.
  • Borrowers in communities of color are much more likely to be underwater than are borrowers in white communities.
  • Borrowers in communities of color are more than twice as likely as are borrowers in white communities to have little to no equity in their homes. In highly African American communities in the Chicago six county region, 40.5 percent of borrowers are underwater, while another 5.4 percent are nearly underwater. Similarly, 40.3 percent of properties are underwater in predominantly Latino communities and 5.3 percent are nearly underwater. In contrast, only 16.7 percent of properties in predominantly white communities are underwater, with another 4.4 percent nearly underwater.
  • Almost three times as many properties in communities of color are severely underwater compared to properties in white communities. In predominantly African American communities, 30.1 percent of properties have loan-to-value (LTV) ratios—a comparison of outstanding mortgage debt to home value—exceeding 110 percent, while that figure is 30 percent in predominantly Latino communities. In contrast, just 10.1 percent of the properties in predominantly white communities have LTVs exceeding 110 percent.
  • Borrowers in communities of color have much less equity in their homes than do borrowers in white communities, resulting in a significant wealth gap.
  •  Only about one-third of homeowners in communities of color have significant equity in their homes. In predominantly African American communities, 34.5 percent of borrowers have more than 25 percent equity in their homes, while 33.1 percent of borrowers in Latino communities have more than 25 percent equity in their homes. Fifty-five percent of borrowers in predominantly white communities have more than 25 percent equity.
  • Borrowers in communities of color have much higher average loan-to-value ratios than do borrowers in predominantly white communities. The average LTV ratio is 92.1 in predominantly African American communities and 87.4 in Latino communities, compared with an average LTV ratio of 67.7 in predominantly white communities.

Negative equity contributes to community decline by potentially leading to increased foreclosure activity, threatening the success of foreclosure prevention programs, and draining neighborhood wealth. In addition, the destruction of assets caused by negative home equity may disproportionately threaten the economic security of people of color because home equity is a larger proportion of their net worth than it is for white people.

View the full report here:  http://bit.ly/strugglingtostayafloat

The report concluded with a number of policy recommendations to reduce the negative impacts of concentrated negative equity, including:

  • Servicers should use principal reduction as a foreclosure prevention tool more broadly.
  • The Federal Housing Finance Authority should permit loans backed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to be eligible for principal reductions.
  • Servicers should streamline processes for short sales.

Tom Feltner | Vice President

Woodstock Institute

29 E Madison Suite 1710 | Chicago, Illinois 60602

T 312/368-0310 x2028  | F 312/368-0316 | M 312/927-0391

www.woodstockinst.org | tfeltner@woodstockinst.org | @tfeltner

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EPI News: Today’s labor market – Mixed signals

March 16, 2012 1 comment

English: Bureau of Labor Statistics logo RGB c...

The latest assortment of government data tells different stories about the strength of the economy, providing no guarantee that we are yet experiencing a self-sustaining, robust jobs recovery.

The good news: State-level data show signs of recovery

State-level data released this week by the Bureau of Labor Statistics show that most states have been experiencing the steady progress towards economic recovery seen nationally. Over the four-month period from October 2011 to January 2012, every state except New York experienced a reduction in its unemployment rate. Over the course of a year (from January 2011 to January 2012), seven states experienced job growth exceeding 2.0 percent, while North Dakota experienced growth of 5.7 percent. Notably, five states (Alaska, Mississippi, Missouri, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin) lost jobs over this period, led by Wisconsin’s loss of 12,500 jobs. (Click here for interactive state maps.)

Despite these generally positive trends, four states and the District of Columbia have unemployment rates at or above 10.0 percent (led by Nevada at 12.7 percent), while 11 states plus the District of Columbia have unemployment rates of 9.0 percent or higher.

“States looking to further spur economic growth should invest more significantly in infrastructure, such as transportation networks, schools, and broadband, while avoiding budget cuts that would impede economic recovery today and could compromise future economic prosperity,” wrote EPI’s Douglas Hall, director of the Economic Analysis and Research Network.

The not-so-good news: Low level of voluntary quits should temper recent optimism about the labor market

Through examining voluntary quits, this week’s Economic Snapshot provides further evidence that the country’s labor market is not yet out of the woods. Voluntary quits, defined as workers who voluntarily leave their jobs, are high when job opportunities are plentiful and employed workers have the flexibility to look for jobs that pay better and more closely match their skills and experience. During downturns, on the other hand, the number of voluntary quits drops as job opportunities become scarce. The Snapshot shows that the number of voluntary quits is still more than 30 percent below the pre-recession level—and has seen no improvement since last summer.

More of the same: Job-seekers ratio remains unchanged

Finally, Tuesday’s release of the latest Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey by the Bureau of Labor Statistics showed decreases in both job openings and hires in January. However, the job-seekers ratio—the ratio of unemployed workers to job openings—was 3.7-to-1 in January, unchanged from the revised December ratio.

“The softness in January’s job openings is inconsistent with the strength of January’s employment and unemployment report,” explained EPI labor economist Heidi Shierholz. “These inconsistencies underscore that it is too soon to declare that we have entered a self-sustained period of robust job growth.”

Brad Plumer of the Washington Post cited Shierholz’s analysis for his Wonkblog piece “Why are wages still stagnant? Blame the labor market”:

“There are still 3.7 job seekers for every available employment opportunity. That’s down considerably from the brutal 6.7-to-1 ratio seen in July, 2009. But as Heidi Shierholz of the Economic Policy Institute points out, the current ratio is also higher than at any point during the 2001 downturn. Across just about every industry, competition remains intense for a limited number of jobs, which means that employers are under less pressure to offer higher pay in order to entice prospective workers.”

EPI in the news

Shierholz’s analysis of last Friday’s release of the Employment Situation Summary by the Bureau of Labor Statistics was also picked up by multiple national media outlets, including the Washington Post, NPR, McClatchy, Huffington Post, and CNBC.

  • Speaking to NPR’s Scott Neuman, Shierholz explained why the labor market still needs to gain many more jobs to return to its pre-recession health, and why it’s difficult to predict when this will occur. “We don’t have some historical perspective to compare this to and go, ‘OK, we know from experience that when the unemployment rate gets to X, or the number of jobs gets to whatever, that’s when people will start coming back,’” she said.
  • And Shierholz told the Huffington Post’s Lila Shapiro that although we are seeing job growth, “it’s still a hellish job search out there” for job seekers.

EPI President Lawrence Mishel’s latest research on young workers’ declining wages continues to inform the national economic conversation. Mishel’s findings were most recently cited by the New York Times,CBS News, Huffington Post, and Think Progress.

  • From the New York Times editorial “Better Numbers on Jobs”:
    “Years into a weak labor market, and with years to go before full recovery, the scars are becoming all too apparent. Recent data from the Economic Policy Institute shows that the inflation-adjusted hourly wage of college-educated men aged 23 to 29 dropped 5.2 percent from 2007 to 2011, and for female college graduates of the same age, 4.4 percent. Joblessness and wage declines are also pronounced for those with only a high school education. For those men aged 19 to 25, wages fell 8 percent from 2007 to 2011. For those young women, the decline was 3.1 percent.”
  • CBS News’ MoneyWatch:Recent college graduates have had a hard time landing jobs and those that have jobs, are earning less. The Economic Policy Institute found that the average inflation-adjusted hourly wage for male college graduates aged 23 to 29 dropped 11 percent over the past decade. For female college graduates of the same age, the average wage is down 7.6 percent.”
  • Huffington Post: “A new analysis from the Economic Policy Institute shows what a lot of younger Americans have probably noticed for themselves: even if you’re lucky enough to have a job, it’s still tough to get ahead. Over the last decade, wages for younger male college grads have plummeted by 11 percent, while women college grads saw their paychecks drop by 7.6 percent.”
  • And Think Progress: “Not only has the Great Recession been bad for workers entering the workforce, but as the Economic Policy Institute noted, the entire last decade has essentially been lost in terms of entry-level wages.”

How I Remember Patty Rouse

March 15, 2012 Leave a comment

March 15, 2012
By Bart Harvey, Former Enterprise Chairman and CEO

When I heard about Patty’s condition, I went in to see her two Saturdays ago, expecting the worst.

When I got to Vantage House, she was alone, sitting in a chair in her room with perfect posture, perfectly coiffed, primly dressed and totally alert. I was quite surprised, and said, “Hi there Patty,” and in that sweet Norfolk drawl she answered back, “Well, hi there.”

I couldn’t tell whether she knew who I was, but she covered it perfectly. Then, suddenly, a Catholic priest entered, saying he was covering for the Episcopal minister who was out of town, and with great solemnity asked how she was doing. She answered back that she was doing just fine – but how was the priest doing? Was he feeling okay?

I nearly burst out laughing, shaking my head and saying to myself, “They just don’t make them like Patty anymore.” And I heard in the background her saying to the priest, “It was nice of you to stop by, and if I can help you at all, let me know.”

Patty sitting there in her nicely patterned wool suit and her lovely Southern manner and pattern of conversation brought a flood of memories back to me – of her and Jim, of many trips together, of the start of Enterprise 30 years ago, of all the wonderful people at Enterprise who cared so well for her and her appreciation of her Enterprise family, of her own family and all the Rouses, of the remarkable journey she took and the people she helped as part of a duo and in her own right.

Bart-harvey-remarks

I marveled at the journey Patty Rouse had taken. An independent Southern girl who won a sailing contest as a teenager, the first woman Commissioner of the Norfolk Public Housing Authority, a divorcee who struck out on her own and let a tennis match and Jim Rouse bring her north and into the maelstrom of real estate development and Enterprise and poor neighborhoods.

She adapted to her new life and became deeply involved at Enterprise as vice president and secretary and served on its various boards. She was always looking out for her Enterprise family, attending functions, giving Jim the high sign when his speeches went on too long, tending to the details, lending her support.

She never took credit herself, always saying “Jim did that,” but he couldn’t have and wouldn’t have done it without her support, help, encouragement and devotion. People at Enterprise understood that, I understood that, her family understood that.

Outside of Enterprise, she sat on a number of commissions, tasks forces and boards, but her heart was always with Jim Rouse, Enterprise and much of the mission work of Church of the Saviour in Washington, D.C.

She took quite a journey and quite a risk, and after Jim died, she continued on and I was grateful that she was carrying on a legacy and living it every day, until she couldn’t anymore.

Enterprise has lost its other co-founder, but I believe, and I know Patty does too, what Patty and Jim Rouse did deserves to not only continue but to be multiplied many times. They weren’t casual about the importance of what they were doing and they gave up a lot to carry out their beliefs. They believed that those at Enterprise would be up to the task and do even more than they could imagine.

States with highest foreclosure rates shift

February 17, 2012 Leave a comment
Foreclosure Today
Posted 02/17/2012
There has been a shift in states with the highest foreclosure rates. About a month ago, Nevada took the number one spot followed by Arizona, California, Georgia and Utah according to RealtyTrac. Now that the settlement is in place there are hopes of improvement among the rates but in the meantime, the rate of those in mortgage default and in need of help with foreclosure continues to shift and increase. The following stats were reported in an article on Yahoo! Real Estate.
1. Florida—
2011 foreclosure rate: 11.9%
December, 2011 unemployment: 9.9% (6th highest)
Home price change (2006Q3-2011Q3): -49% (3rd largest decline)
Processing period: 135 days

2. New Jersey—

2011 foreclosure rate: 6.4%
December, 2011 unemployment: 9% (13th highest)
Home price change (2006Q3-2011Q3): -22.6% (14th largest decline)
Processing period: 270 days

3. Illinois—

2011 foreclosure rate: 5.4%
December, 2011 unemployment: 9.8% (7th highest)
Home price change (2006Q3-2011Q3): -29% (7th largest decline)
Processing period: 300 days

4. Nevada—

2011 foreclosure rate: 5.3%
December, 2011 unemployment: 12.6% (the highest)
Home price change (2006Q3-2011Q3): -59.3% (the largest decline)
Processing period: 116 days

5. New York—

2011 foreclosure rate: 4.6%
December, 2011 unemployment: 8% (23rd highest)
Home price change (2006Q3-2011Q3): -13.6% (23rd largest decline)
Processing period: 445 days

Is There a Wikipedia to Go Dark for Homeowners?

February 7, 2012 Leave a comment
English: Foreclosure Sign, Mortgage Crisis


Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress
Posted: 02/ 6/2012 5:44 pm

When Congress was on the brink of pushing through legislation that Internet advocates opposed, over four million online signatures were gathered quickly. Congress relented.

Today, millions of American households are poised to benefit directly from the opportunity to reduce mortgage payments, avoid foreclosure, build up some savings, or have a few thousand dollars to spend a little more freely. Yet while even conservative economists believe that easier refinancings will boost the economy and help millions more families — a major part of Congress is ready to say a big, “No, let’s not even try.”

Not a day elapsed after President Obama outlined a more ambitious set of proposals to let average families take advantage of the same low interest rates that have benefited upper income households and large corporations before Speaker Boehner among others declared the idea dead on arrival.

“All [the refinancing plan] does is delay the clearing of the market,” Speaker Boehner told reporters. “As soon as the market clears and we understand where the prices really are — [that] will be the most important thing we can do in order to improve home values around the country.”

Saying millions of families should wait until the “market clears” is the modern equivalent of “let them eat cake.” Clearing the market is an economist’s term for letting the tidal wave of foreclosures continue. But unchecked foreclosures drag down everyone’s home values, let vacant homes pile up in neighborhoods, and force families to choose between struggling to make needlessly high mortgage payments or become another default statistic with ruined credit.

It is time to ask lenders and investors to shoulder some of the burden, and Congress should be taking the lead on this, not finding objections. As my colleagues at the Center for American Progress and I explain in detail, the principles of accountability to avoid more foreclosures — especially for families who haven’t missed payments — is at the core of the administration’s expanded proposal for making refinancing easier.

Families with mortgages, however, are not an easily organized constituency. Unlike the protesters most engaged in social media who were the bulwark of those moved to criticize SOPA and PIPA, borrowers are not necessarily the internet generation nor an easily reached interest group.

But given the politics of “embrace the opposite of what Obama proposes,” homeowners struggling to keep making payments could use a Wiki dark day of their own. And so could the tens of millions of others who live next door, as no neighborhood really wants another foreclosure.

Low Mortgage Rates — Finally Having Impact on Housing Market?

January 25, 2012 Leave a comment

CIN Alert for January 24, 2012

Vicky and Joe had always dreamed of buying a nice neat home in a Northern city suburb. That dream came true in 1972 when they purchased a Cape Cod style three bedroom home for $45,000 with a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage of 7.5%.

Joe remembers telling Vicky at the time that they would never see rates that low again, and over most of the next 40 years he was right.

However, something quite unusual has happened during the past several years: mortgage rates have plummeted to new record low levels, most recently 3.88 %. Of course, Joe and Vicky, now retired, don’t need the low rates anymore, but for many others – including their kids and grandkids — those rates seem very inviting.

Inviting they may be, but the low rates have not thus far been able to trigger a strong stimulation of the US housing market as (sad to say) relatively few people qualified for the lower rates. High unemployment and small wage gains have made it harder for many people to qualify. Other would-be borrowers didn’t want to sink money into a home that they fear could lose value over the next few years.

However, new statistics just released would seem to indicate that things are beginning to change. Perhaps there is good news coming over the horizon.

“Existing home sales rose for the third consecutive month in December, according to data released Friday by the National Association of Realtors, which touts the upswing as a sign of recovery in the national housing market.

“Sales of existing homes rose to a seasonally adjusted rate of 4.42 million during the final month of the year, marking a 5% increase over the downwardly revised 4.39 million homes sold in November and a 4 percent increase over the 4.25 million homes sold in October.

“The number of homes sold in December 2011 also marked a 3.6 percent increase over the 4.45 million homes sold during the same month one year ago. “The pattern of home sales in recent months demonstrates a market in recovery,” NAR chief economist Lawrence Yun said in a statement. “Record low mortgage interest rates, job growth and bargain home prices are giving more consumers the confidence they need to enter the market.” (Source: The Washington Post)

Builders are hopeful that the low rates will boost sales even more as the year progresses. In fact, low mortgage rates were cited as a key reason the National Association of Home Builders survey of builder sentiment rose in December to its highest level in more than a year.
Mortgage rates are one of the major issues your CIN editors monitor and report on regularly in our Housing Section, which is designed to provide information to prospective homebuyers, their counselors and advisors, lenders, developers, and others focused on the critical issues surrounding housing.

These include aspects of arranging financing and other details of the purchasing process, such as obtaining a fair appraisal of the value of the intended home. We also present information on various bank mortgage lending programs and mortgage banking programs to help borrowers understand the process they are entering as they select a home for purchase. Here’s a sample of some articles recently included in CIN’s Housing Section:

One million homeowners may get mortgage writedowns: U.S.
(Source: Reuters) About one million American homeowners would get write downs in the size of their mortgages under a proposed deal with banks over shady foreclosure practices. The deal, which could be struck within weeks, would mark the largest cut in the mortgage load since the start of the credit crisis.

Do FHA Mortgage Borrowers Still Face Credit Score Layering?
(Source: Our Broker.com) More than a year has passed since HUD announced that it would investigate 22 lenders on possible ‘Layering’, the addition of requirements on top of FHA standards. The investigations are in response to 22 complaints the National Community Reinvestment Coalition (NCRC) filed with HUD alleging that the loan activities of the mortgage originators showed that their home lending practices deny FHA- insured loans to African-Americans and Latinos with credit scores as high as 640.

WSJ: Home Equity Squeeze Sparks Reverse Mortgage Revival
(Source: Reverse Mortgage Daily) The real-estate crunch left most home values with much to be desired, prompting a revival in reverse mortgages. Although the number of reverse mortgage endorsements has decreased compared to its peak a few years ago, lending has been picking up, with MetLife Bank’s 2011 reverse originations increasing by 171% compared to the previous year.

Confidence Among U.S. Homebuilders Climbs to Highest Since 2007
(Source: Bloomberg) Confidence among U.S. homebuilders rose in January to the highest level in more than four years as sales and buyer traffic improved. The National Association of Home Builders/Wells Fargo sentiment gauge increased to 25 this month, exceeding the median forecast of economists surveyed by Bloomberg News and reaching the highest level since June 2007.

Feds investigating possible fraud at GE’s former subprime unit
(Source: i watch news) Federal authorities are investigating possible fraud at General Electric Co.’s former subprime mortgage arm amid increased public pressure to hold Wall Street accountable for its role in the financial crisis.

Mortgage, foreclosure issues top AG’s complaint list for the first time
(Source: Boston.com) Complaints about mortgage, loan modification and foreclosure issues soared in 2011 and were the biggest source of problems for consumers who asked the Massachusetts State Attorney General’s office for help.

COMMENTARY:
Why Falling Home Ownership Is a Good Thing
(Source: The Motley Fool) Commentator Dan Caplinger opines that falling levels of home ownership may not be such a bad thing, since for many, owning a home never made financial sense and avoiding the burden of having so much debt on one’s biggest asset can make financial life a lot easier.

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